Fishing Forum
Skip to Content


Report Post | Register to Reply
Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs?
 
Bear with me, as this is my first post on here and I might be a little specific with the info I'm seeking...

I fish on a weekly basis along the Sacramento River, mainly for trout and steelhead, but I anticipate salmon season every August looking to score some kings. I've always been an avid spinning reel kind of guy, but want to try something new and challenge myself with a baitcaster. I do all my fishing from the shore. Drift fishing with a couple ounces bouncing roe is what most do around here, but my girlfriend and I have actually landed more and bigger kings off of Kastmasters, believe it or not. 75% of my fishing season, it's for trout and maybe some steelhead. My lure size ranges from 1/3oz. up to 1oz. Nothing bigger. Nothing smaller. Initially I was looking into an entry level Abu Max series type of baitcaster until I knew if I was going to like it or not. These types of baitcasters I'm sure can bomb those lures further than my spinning reel, but then I started looking into reels like the Abu Ambassadeur and the Shimano Cardiff. I started to wonder if the Max series would hold up if I had one of our average 20-40lb. kings on the line, but I also started to wonder if the Ambassadeur & Cardiff would be too large to launch a 1/2oz. Kastmaster any further than my spinning reel, being that it seems these reels are made more-so for weights upwards of several ounces.

To sum it up, I'm trying to figure out what reel type would benefit me more than my spinning setup. I'm looking for distance with the lures I'm working with, but also something that'll stand up to the fight of a fairly large fish. Being that the Max series is a bass type of reel, I'm skeptical as to if it'd handle a king. Also, if the Ambassadeur (4500, 5500, 6500) & Cardiff (200, 300, 400) isn't out of the question, what size would you guys recommend? Like I've said, I've never used a baitcaster, but I have the concept down. I just worry that buying one of those larger reels won't cast my most commonly used lures as far as my spinning gear. I'm looking for someone to tell me otherwise. Maybe the Max series is best for my lures and the Ambassadeur & Cardiff are better suited for the drift fishing with 2oz. weights? I'm only looking to buy one at the moment, but if I have to choose, I want it to get my Kastmasters to the other side of that river. Wink Drift fishing with the heavier weights comes second.

For what it's worth, my current setup is a size 40 Pflueger President XT. A St. Croix Premier 7' Medium rod. I use 8lb. Fireline with 6lb. P-Line CFX during trout/steelhead season and 20lb. Fireline with 15lb. P-Line CXX during salmon season (with a 8'6" Lamiglas rod). When I invest into baitcasting, I'll probably be looking at something along the lines of a 7' medium or medium/heavy rod. Feel free to give your 2 cents on that as well. I know 7' isn't the standard for salmon, but I want to use it year round and I've caught plenty of kings on a 7' rod. Again, this is the "if I can only have one" situation.

I apologize in advance for this being long and drawn out. I've searched several forums and often times people don't provide enough information when they submit an inquiry.
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Chris_530] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
I've always felt that spinning reels cast farther than casting reels any day of the week. There is no resistance or drag on the line of a spinning reel, where as a bait casting reel always has the drag of the spool. I think you're going to get your feelings hurt if you think you'll out cast a spinning reel with a casting reel.

There is something else to consider with a spinning reel, which is versatility. I noticed you target lots of different fish species of varying sizes. With a spinning reel, you simply buy a spare spool, and put the line you need for the target species on it. You don't need a huge spinning reel to get the job done, because they produce nearly double the drag resistance of an equivalent casting reel.

I'd start with an all steel spinning reel in the size you need. Something like a Penn Sargus or Battle. Buy an extra spool for the reel. With the all steel frame, it can handle the big boys spooled with heavy braid. For your lighter work for line shy fish, spool up the spare with mono, or a co-polymer. The only thing you'll need to do is have two rods you can switch the reel back and forth from. One for your heavy work, and one for your lighter work.

Also, if you're looking for distance, go with braid line and a stiffer, longer rod. It's not the reel that is holding you back bud, it's how you've got it set up.



Bryan Draper

Your Saltwater and South Carolina Moderator




http://www.catchemcreekoutfitters.com


Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Tarpon4me] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
i wouldnt say the drag of the reel is such an issue.. baitcasters backlash often if improperly set up because the spool is capable of spinning faster than the line can come off. so thats not really holding it back.. but spinning reels, though no drag from the spool still has drag from the eyes of the rod as the line spins off in a circular pattern whipping against the eyes, and the less line on the spool, the less distance youll get from a cast due to the line having to be pulled from behind the top of the reel

im relatively new to baitcasters, i have about a week experience with them and used spinning reels exclusively before that, and already i notice a difference, and my line is poorly optimized for distance as im using a 20lb monofilament line

my reel is typically a round baitcaster, its an abu garcia, but its smaller than the typical ones, scaled down and even i notice that if my reel was any bigger of a round baitcaster it would feel top heavy in the hand and become more akward to use, so im thinking of going purely with a low-profile setup and get an orra sx

one issue i had switching to a baitcaster which is a much bigger hurdle than backlashes is the fact that the outdoor stores here only had right hand retrieve models in stock.. for the life of me i cant understand why these are more popular, if you cast with your right hand it only makes sense to reel with the left so your hand never has to leave the rod and i always used a left hand retrieve on all my spinning reels
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [jason41987] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
If your spinning reel is matched to the rod, as in, the spool of the reel isn't huge compared to the eyelets on the rod, the process of line moving through the guides isn't an issue.

If you were in SC, i'd challenge you. Pick two rods that are identical, but one for spinning reels, and one for bait casters. Install a reel on each as appropriate. Now, spool both reels with the same line, and tie on just a weight.

See which one you can cast farther, when the only variable is the type of reel itself. I know which one will win, i've done it before. Wink



Bryan Draper

Your Saltwater and South Carolina Moderator




http://www.catchemcreekoutfitters.com


Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Tarpon4me] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
I have an array of rods on my wall for all my spinning needs as well as 5 or so spinning reels with extra spools filled with different size lines for different situations, and as noted, I use Fireline as my main line, so I'm familiar with the braid aspect.

I feel like this is slightly drifting away from my initial inquiry. I've done extensive research on "baitcasters vs. spinning" and I'm not trying to differentiate the two at this point. I'm more-so trying to figure out which size baitcaster would best suit my needs. I'm trying to keep the spinning aspect out of this. I'm merely wanting to learn a new fishing technique, which is baitcasting. It's not meant to replace spinning, but I just want to broaden my skill with learning something new.

You've got your smaller "low profile" style baitcasters that most commonly seem to be used for bass. Then you have your larger "round" baitcasters (that you still can purchase in a somewhat small size) that seem to target larger fish, but I'm wondering if these round baitcasters have the ability to throw my average 3/8, 1/2 and 3/4oz. lures further than I already can with my spinning gear. If they aren't, then I might need to reevaluate the low profile baitcasters which seem optimal for those size weights, but then I have to question what size fish they can really handle.

I live in Red Bluff, CA. We hold the CA state record for the largest king salmon caught at 88lbs. It was only 9 pounds shy of the world record. This was less than a mile from my house. We have BIG fish running through here. Most caught these days are half that, but point being, I want something that won't potentially give out on me on that "just in case" situation.
(This post was edited by Chris_530 on Jul 12, 2013, 12:31 PM)
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Chris_530] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
Chris_530 wrote:
I have an array of rods on my wall for all my spinning needs as well as 5 or so spinning reels with extra spools filled with different size lines for different situations, and as noted, I use Fireline as my main line, so I'm familiar with the braid aspect.

I feel like this is slightly drifting away from my initial inquiry. I've done extensive research on "baitcasters vs. spinning" and I'm not trying to differentiate the two at this point. I'm more-so trying to figure out which size baitcaster would best suit my needs. I'm trying to keep the spinning aspect out of this. I'm merely wanting to learn a new fishing technique, which is baitcasting. It's not meant to replace spinning, but I just want to broaden my skill with learning something new.

You've got your smaller "low profile" style baitcasters that most commonly seem to be used for bass. Then you have your larger "round" baitcasters (that you still can purchase in a somewhat small size) that seem to target larger fish, but I'm wondering if these round baitcasters have the ability to throw my average 3/8, 1/2 and 3/4oz. lures further than I already can with my spinning gear. If they aren't, then I might need to reevaluate the low profile baitcasters which seem optimal for those size weights, but then I have to question what size fish they can really handle.

I live in Red Bluff, CA. We hold the CA state record for the largest king salmon caught at 88lbs. It was only 9 pounds shy of the world record. This was less than a mile from my house. We have BIG fish running through here. Most caught these days are half that, but point being, I want something that won't potentially give out on me on that "just in case" situation.

I apologize if I migrated a different direction from your original topic. That was probably my A.D.D. I do however, typically challenge anglers to see what it is driving their decision, to help them avoid an expensive mistake for the wrong reasons. With that said, it doesn't seem as if you so much want something universal or better, you just want to try something different.

The larger bait casting reels can cast the lighter lures to an extent, however, their casting range will be limited versus a smaller, low profile bait casters designed for that application. If you went with a high quality low profile reel, they'll handle fish well in excess of what you might interpret from the line class specified on the reel. Make sure it doesn't have all brass gears and such, which a large fish will shred under an exaggerated load. (heavier braid line, and a locked down drag) the only down side to bait casting reels with steel gears is you loose some of the silky operation, but you gain strength and power. Brass internals are very smooth in cooperation with a ball bearing drive, but they lack the capability to hold up under heavy strain.

With all that said, it's not a freshwater bait caster you should be looking for, it's a saltwater one. Check Basspro and cabelas, or something similar for saltwater series baitcasters. They should be stainless steel gears, and all while keeping the smooth operation and low profile that is needed for casting lighter lures. Be for warned though, they will be more expensive, and i'd be ready to buy two since you can't quick change the spool. I hope this helps. I can recommend a saltwater series casting reel if you'd like. I've used my share of casting reels, and have friends that continue to. Mostly for inshore fishing for redfish, speckled trout, and black drum.



Bryan Draper

Your Saltwater and South Carolina Moderator




http://www.catchemcreekoutfitters.com


Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Tarpon4me] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
I'm hesitant on spending too much money on a setup at this point just in case baitcasting isn't up my alley. Maybe I need to take up baitcasting on a low profile setup during normal trout season when that type of reel would benefit me more. We're going into salmon season in a week and I shouldn't be investing in the larger, more expensive gear if I don't know if I'm going to even like it. I've never had any problems with spinning. I just wanted to see if I could get even more distance out of my casts.

It doesn't help that I'm one of those looking for a left-hand retrieve. I often find sales and good deals, but they're for righties only. Although, after your comment about looking into saltwater reels, I did find this sale reel on Cabelas that is in stock only in a left-handed model and is almost half price:

http://www.cabelas.com/...480%253Bcat104760180
(This post was edited by Chris_530 on Jul 12, 2013, 1:36 PM)
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Chris_530] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
i was recently in your shoes.. been using spinning reels since i was a kid and recently took an interest in baitcasters.. the first couple hours i had some backlashes, no problem, i just made sure i properly set the spool tension to the weight of the lure and added more braking if i needed it.. putting my thumb on the spool right before it hits the water was second nature to me

after just a couple hours and the only time since then i had a backlash (using these reels for a week now) is when i shanked a cast as i was trying to cast from a position i wasnt familiar with (sort of over and across my body with my off-hand).. and this backlash took me about 15 seconds to fix, was a very minor one, so i cast with confidence now and im not even the slightest bit worried anymore.. and its not like this 20lb monofilament makes it any easier, i should be using 12lb mono or 20-30lb braided

my reel though being a round baitcaster is the size of a low profile, so i can get a feeling of what a low profile and a round would offer.. and in my opinion the round baitcaster would offer more in unnecessary line capacity as im only running on 85 yards of 20lb test and never even got close to losing my line.. and im getting close to 30 inch northern pikes with it..

my impression is that if this reel of mine was any larger, such as a full size C3 or C4 ambassadeur it would feel a lot more top heavy and its only added benefit would be that higher line capacity.. a low profile baitcaster would have the same spool size as what i have now, which would allow me 125 yards of 50lb test braid, 200 yards of 30lb test braid and around 300 if i used 20lb test braid..

so a low profile baitcaster would offer plenty of line, at plenty of strength for anything you could think about fishing, be better balanced, and what i really like about smaller baitcasters besides the balance is just how simple they are to use one handed (as opposed to having to flip the bail or twist the spool before casting a spinning reel

that being said, if you had your crank on your spinning reels on the left side so you can cast and retrieve without switching hands, be sure you get a baitcaster with a left hand retrieve as well.. smaller baitcasters are really light and easy to use single handed for casting, easier to cast once you get the hang of it, and if mine was a left hand retrieve i would simply be completely in love with it.. so im selling mine after a week to order a left hand model online (i might go with the abu orra SX, but im open to $50-$100 suggestions)

as for left hand retrieve its beginning to become quite popular as just about anyone who makes a baitcaster now offers one in a left handed configuration and i predict they may even become more common than right handed so just order online if there are no left handed models locally, which is what i'll do

i hope my recent personal experience in switching from spinning to baitcasters is of any help, and i dont intend on going back to spinning reels again
(This post was edited by jason41987 on Jul 12, 2013, 6:03 PM)
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [jason41987] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
Last night before I posted this inquiry on here, I contacted both Shimano and Abu Garcia to get their professional opinion. Both replied today at almost the same exact time. Heres what they had to say:

Shimano:
"Chris,
You would be better off staying away from the Caius and Caenan
(their low profile models). Since you are fishing in a river you may get a fish in the current and the small low profile reel may not have the line capacity necessary. While a low profile reel will cast better because of the lighter spool. The new small round baitcasters will work just as well. The (Cardiff) 200 and 300 size are better casting due to the lighter spools.

You may want to look at the Calcutta B or D models. They are pricier but they will cast like a low profile reel and they are extremely durable."


Abu Garcia:
"Hi Chris,
Thank-you for your email. For the fishing application you are doing, we suggest to take a look at our Revo Toro Series
(their higher end low profile reels). The Black Max would be too light for this application. If you are wanting a round reel, we would suggest our 6500C3 or 6600C4. The only difference between these two is the thumb bar, gear ratio and bearings. We hope we are not confusing you with all of this information. If you have any other questions, please email us back or contact us directly by calling 1-800-228-4272."

So, to sum it up, they both think I should go with a "round" reel and stay away from the low profiles. I was hoping to stay around $60 since I'm not even 100% sure baitcasting will be for me. The Shimano Cardiff is about $100. It's doable, but they recommend the Calcutta B ($200) and D ($340-$380 depending on size). Abu's Revo they recommended is about $280. I'm really curious about the Ambassadeur in 4500 and 5500, whereas they recommend the 6500 or 6600. I've never held one yet, but I can't help but to think their recommendation just might be overkill for my needs. If I'm drift fishing, I'll never cast anything over 2oz., but 99% of my time, I'll be using 3/8-3/4oz. lures. As Jason said, aren't I just gaining a ton more line that I'll never get to the bottom of by going to a larger reel in the same model? I understand they're trying to sell me something of higher quality where the gears won't shred on me, but can't I gain that with the Cardiff and smaller Ambassadeur's? I think my next step is going to our local Sportsmans Warehouse and talking to their fishing guys and feel their display models.
(This post was edited by Chris_530 on Jul 12, 2013, 4:48 PM)
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Chris_530] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
by the sounds of it, they dont necessarily want you to go with a round baitcaster as much as they want you to go with one of their more expensive models... as salesman its their job to try to sell you into buying something you dont necessarily need.. heck, my dad regularly lands 27 inch carp on a $15 spincast reel, ive gotten them atleast that size, in rivers on a spinning reel i got in a combo kit for $20

so id be quite cautious if theyre trying to talk you into a $250-$300 reel especially when youre not even sure you want to stick with it.. i guess BCX or black max if you wanted abu garcia, but shakespeare makes some really inexpensive round and low profile baitcasters, and then theres always the option of selling the reel after youve used it if you dont like it
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [jason41987] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
I'll do the hands-on approach and check out the Shimano Cardiff in 200 & 300 and the Abu Garcia Ambassadeur in 45, 55, and 6500 and see where it leads me. In the end, if I realize I don't benefit from throwing lures with it, I'm sure it'll be optimal for drift fishing with 2 ounces over my spinning rig.

Also, mentioned earlier was the fact that you don't have interchangeable spools. True, but can't you pretty much tie on any size leader onto your main line? Excluding salmon season, I mainly use 8 or 10lb. Fireline and using the yucatan knot, I attach my 6, 8, or sometimes 10lb. fluorocarbon leader directly to my line. I've caught 20+lb. kings on accident with 8lb. fireline and a 6lb. leader. I'm sure if I had a baitcasting setup with maybe 15lb. Fireline and a 10 or 12lb. leader, I'd be safe. And out of salmon season, I could still use that main line and use a lighter leader. I'm not so worried about not being able to change out my main line.
(This post was edited by Chris_530 on Jul 12, 2013, 11:47 PM)
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Chris_530] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
even if casting distance was the same im not giving up my baitcasting setups now.. mine feels more like a low profile setup than a round baitcaster and there are just too many benefits for me to go back to spinning.. so much so i think my next project might just be making my own casting rod from a blank
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [jason41987] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
Since Sportsmans Warehouse is about 30 minutes from me, I went to my local fishing place here in town that is privately owned and talked with the owner and felt a few differents reels. Some of what he said seemed to contradict everything I've read online, which made me wonder if it was just an old man telling me what he thought as opposed to what he knew, although he did say he fishes both spinning and baitcasting. He said a spinning reel will cast MUCH further than any baitcaster. Even with me being a spinning guy, I for some reason don't believe that. He also told me that what Shimano and Abu Garcia told me as far as me being better off with a round baitcaster was BS. He said that the round baitcasters aren't very good for casting with distance and that's why I should focus more on a low profile, but that they still won't cast as far as a spinning reel. I don't know if I'm going to feed into that just yet. I will say that I liked the feeling of the Cardiff over the Ambassadeur, though. I think maybe I should just invest in something like an Abu Garcia Silver Max and see how it works for me before going for the pricier round reel.
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Chris_530] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
Chris530 -

I think a lot of people compare a small spinning reel to a bait casting reel when they think about casting distance. The fishing application you have mentioned would require a spinning reel in the 5000 to 6000 size, some anglers may even use larger size spinning reels for large king salmon. Bait casting reels used in this same fishing application would be the larger low profile reels (Shimano Curado 300 or the Abu Toro) or the round bait casting reels in the 200 - 300 size. Again some anglers may feel more comfortable with a 400 size round reel for larger king salmon. Casting distance between the two kinds of reels has to be compared between the size or reels you will be using for the fishing application you will be doing. Don't compare the casting distance of a light size (1000-2000) spinning reel to a larger (300-400) round size bait casting reel.

For the type of fishing you are planning to use the bait casting reel for I would suggest the Shimano Curado 301 (left hand crank) or the Abu Toro. These reels will handle fish up to, and including, larger king salmon. Next would be just like the Shimano reps told you the 201 or 301 size Cardiffs or the their Calcutta B's. I know the price of these reels is more than you want to pay, but if you can find a way to get one, you will not be disappointed.

I hope you can find what you are looing for. Many anglers, once they become proficient with a bait caster, will only use a spinning reel to cast very light (1/32 oz up to 1/8 oz) lures.

Good luck.

ClearCreek
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [ClearCreek] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
For the Sacramento River, whether it's salmon season or not, I almost always use a size 40 spinning reel. I have one spool lined for salmon season and one for trout/steelhead. 40 is pretty much the standard most anglers use around here. I don't even think I ever see anyone using 50 or 60's. I have a 30 that I use when I'm at the lakes or fishing strictly for trout, but if I know there's the chance of something larger taking it, I stick to my 40.

With that said, what would be the baitcaster equal to a size 40 spinning reel? When I see low profile reels, the reels themselves all seem the same size. It just seems that the spools themselves get wider or deeper. I can't really differentiate size until I see the round reels. Then it's obvious. If you could recommend me some reels for $100 or less, I'm all ears. Just keep in mind that what I'll be throwing averages 1/2oz. and I'm hoping to get more distance over my spinning setup. That's why I've become a little deterred, since the guy at my local shop said that's not going to happen with a baitcaster.
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Chris_530] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
Chris-

It may be difficult to do a direct comparison, but I will take a stab at it. In my opinion a size 40 spinning reel would be in the range of a casting reel of the 50 or 51 size Curado or Chronarch and the size 50-60 spinning reels equal to a size 200 or 201 Curado or Chronarch and slightly more power would be the smaller round bait casting reels (200-201 Cardiffs, etc.). Then the larger spinning reels would equate to the 300-301 Curados and Toros. And finally the largest spinning reels would be somewhat equal to the 400-401 size Cardiffs, etc. Others may disagree, and if they do I would like to hear their arguments.

As far as a casting reel under a $100 I guess I would tell you to look at the Shimano Citica or the Abu Revos that are close to that price range.

I can tell you if you are casting 1/2 oz lures, using the correct rod, (and that is a whole different conversation that needs to be considered) you will be able to cast a considerably distance with either the Curado, Cardiff, Revo or Calcutta reels, I do not own a Citica so I have no personal experience casting one, but from what I hear they are right there with the Curado for casting distance.

Do others have different opinions? If so lets hear them.

ClearCreek
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Chris_530] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
I think what it boils down to, is it's time for you to make a decision. You're about to hit information over load, and that is going to frustrate you. I can tell you that the information I've provided you is from 20 years of Saltwater and freshwater experience. If there is any doubt, just have a gander at my photo album. I specifically light tackle fish for species well outside the typical load range of my gear with heavy braid and light rods and reels.

Fishing gear is like any other piece of equipment, you get what you pay for. If you buy a 40 dollar reel, you're going to get 40 dollars worth of service out of it. There are some exceptions to that rule, but VERY few. Here are the FACTS:

1. There is no perfect reel that does it all. You need the right reel for the right conditions.

2. Spinning reels of equal proportions will outcast bait casting reels 110% of the time, period.

3. Before you select your reel, consider what your primary target species will be with it, and how you'll be fishing with the gear. You don't buy the rod and reel and then try to make it work for something it wasn't designed to do.

4. Trial and error is your best teacher. We can give you all the information in the world, but there is no replacement for experience. It's a shame you don't have someone close by that will allow you to play with their bait casting equipment before you make a purchase.

5. A biggie for me, spinning reels produce more drag pressure.

I actually started out with bait casting equipment years ago. I remember as a teenager casting an anchor line out off a pier with a 11 foot surf rod and a Penn #9 spooled with 20 lb test. King fishing from a pier, the anchor line was critical, as it set you up for how far out you could send your fighting line. I could sing a 5 oz anchor over 150 yards off the end of a pier with that set up. That was all before I ever handled a spinning rod. When I first started using spinning equipment, I hated it. Of all laim excuses, I didn't like them because I couldn't throw one strait. But now, it's almost all I use. It's even aggravating when i'm fishing offshore. Over the last 4 years, I've successfully removed all my conventional equipment with all steel frame spinning reels. My main gripe? The conventional (over sized bait casting) equipment let the lures/ bait rigs down too slow. With spinning gear, it was like free falling, no resistance. When you're fishing in 120' of water, and you have to wait for your bait to hit bottom, you really notice the subtle differences.



Bryan Draper

Your Saltwater and South Carolina Moderator




http://www.catchemcreekoutfitters.com


Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Chris_530] Best type of baitcasting reel for my needs? In reply to
Any angler who wants to use a wide variety of artificial lures will eventually need to use a baitcasting reel, also known as baitcasters. Although they take time and patience to master, these reels are perfect for accurate casting, allowing you to cast with precision and stop a lure in midair.
So, when you decide to purchase a baitcasting reel, what are some of the things you should consider? Take a look at these helpful tips to get started.

FIND THE RIGHT GEAR RATIO
One of the first things you will need to do is find the right gear ratio—a factor that affects the speed of your lure retrieve. Gear ratio is the number of times the spool turns over when the handle is rotated once. Most reels will have the ratio listed somewhere on the body, which makes the selection process easier. Here’s how it works: with a 5:1 ratio, the spool turns five times during one handle rotation. Therefore, the higher the first number, the faster the retrieve.
Generally, 4:1 ratio is considered slow, 5:1 is average, and 6:1 or higher is pretty fast. You will need to consider what type of lures you will be using to decide what ratio you select. For diving crankbaits and large spinnerbaits, a slower retrieve is recommended, even as low as 3:1. For Texas rigs, jigs, and soft plastics, something in the area of 5:1 is a good choice. For some spinnerbaits, buzz baits, and other lures that need a fast action, you can go with a 6:1 or 7:1 reel.

SPOOL SIZE
Next, you will want to look at the reel’s spool size. If you are pursuing larger and stronger fish, you will inevitably need heavier line, which will take up more space on the spool. If that’s the case, go with a reel that has a nice deep spool that can hold all the line you need. You will also need extra line to let larger fish make runs. So keep in mind, larger fish need larger spools.
For bass fishing, you can use a lighter line, somewhere around 12-pound test will give you the strength you need without sacrificing the versatility and casting accuracy. For this reason, you can get by with a smaller spool.

REMEMBER THAT COMFORT IS KEY
Most importantly, remember that comfort is key. If you purchase a baitcasting reel that doesn’t feel comfortable in your hands you won’t be an effective angler. A comfortable grip and well-balanced rod-and-reel combination can help you cast with more accuracy, especially after you have casted hundreds of times in a single outing. Take the time to try out multiple reels, testing out the mechanisms like thumb latches, tensioners, reeling handles, drag settings, and other features. You can purchase anywhere you choose, but it may be a good idea to visit a large outdoor store that has hundreds of different models for you to try. This will give to a complete perspective on all of the available options, and help you understand the different price ranges for baitcasting reels.

EXCELLENT FISHING SHIRTS FROM HUK
No matter what type of reel you’re using, make sure you have a high-quality fishing shirt to go with it. Visit our online store and you can find long-sleeve fishing shirts that will help you fish longer by keeping you cool and protecting you from the sun. With plenty of styles and high-quality materials, we have everything you need.