Fishing Forum
Skip to Content


Fishing Forum > Utah Fishing Forum : Boats & Motors >

A question on aluminum boats

fishing
Report Post | Register to Reply
A question on aluminum boats
Moderators, you can move this to wherever it should be.

Anyone know of a place or person that can do a good cleaning and buffing the hull of an aluminum boat? Would like to get the 11 years of oxidization off of the unpainted lower portion of the hull on my 14 ft Lund.
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Tin-Can] A question on aluminum boats In reply to
This guy had a booth at the cachecounty fair Nick Fisher (435)-760-7737 he had aluminum rims and semi gas tanks that he polished up. So I asked him if he does boats also and he said yes! You could give him a call
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Tin-Can] A question on aluminum boats In reply to
I've been doing alot lately. Some people have been getting ready to store their boats for the winter.
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [kidscomefirst] A question on aluminum boats In reply to
Thanks for the info. I may give him a call.
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [sharksugar101] A question on aluminum boats In reply to
Hey SS, storing my boat is just a matter of dumping the gas from it into my truck, tilting it up about 45 degrees with all the plugs open, taking everything out of the dry box, and connecting a trickle charger to the battery. Wink

I used to use a compound called Never Dull to polish aircraft jet engine intakes. But not seen it anywhere and don't really have the time or energy or equipment to lift my boat up out of the trailer to get to the entire hull. But would like to get the oxidization buffed out if possible.
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Tin-Can] A question on aluminum boats In reply to
You might be surprised what you can get clean by mixing 3 cups water, 1 cup white vinegar, and a quarter cup of Dawn or Simple Green. Use a green scotch brite pad and get to scrubbing.
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Tin-Can] A question on aluminum boats In reply to
go to the auto part store and ask for some blue magic. it's a metal polish, I polished the intake manifold on my old hot rod and it looked like chrome, so I did the same to my valve covers, and carb.
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Tin-Can] A question on aluminum boats In reply to
I went to YouTube for ideas as I would like to clean my Lund of only 3 yrs if build up. Of course I will try the easiest method at the end of the season.
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Tin-Can] A question on aluminum boats In reply to
That "Never Dull" polish was some good stuff. I used to polish my Harley with it.
Only bad thing about scrubbing and using different kinds of cleaners like other people have mentioned is that after you are done you have to put something over the metal to protect it or it will oxidize even faster.
Just let me know if, or when you want to get it done and I would be happy to do it for you.
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Tin-Can] A question on aluminum boats In reply to
Quote:
But when aluminum rusts, it forms aluminum oxide, an entirely different animal. In crystal form, aluminum oxide is called corundum, sapphire or ruby (depending on the color), and it is among the hardest substances known. If you wanted to design a strong, scratchproof coating to put on a metal, few things other than diamond would be better than aluminum oxide.
By rusting, aluminum is forming a protective coating that's chemically identical to sapphire--transparent, impervious to air and many chemicals, and able to protect the surface from further rusting: As soon as a microscopically thin layer has formed, the rusting stops. ("Anodized" aluminum has been treated with acid and electricity to force it to grow an extra-thick layer of rust, because the more you have on the surface, the stronger and more scratch-resistant it is.)
This invisible barrier forms so quickly that aluminum seems, even in molten form, to be an inert metal. But this illusion can be shattered with aluminum's archenemy, mercury.
Applied to aluminum's surface, mercury will infiltrate the metal and disrupt its protective coating, allowing it to "rust" (in the more destructive sense) continuously by preventing a new layer of oxide from forming.

I've heard that during World War II, commandos were sent deep into German territory to smear mercury paste on aircraft to make them inexplicably fall apart. Whether the story is true or not, the sabotage would have worked. The few-micron-thick layer of aluminum oxide is the only thing holding an airplane together. Think about that the next time you're flying. Or maybe it's better if you don't.

If you want to weaken your boat, go ahead.



<{{{{>


Fishrmn

"I tolerate with the utmost latitude the right of others to differ from me in opinion."
Thomas Jefferson

"The difference between genius and stupidity is; genius has its limits."
Albert Einstein
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [fish_hntr] A question on aluminum boats In reply to
Man that sounds like a lot more work than I want to do.
Ya know, the older I get the more I would rather have someone else do this kind of work.
Report Post | Register to Reply
Re: [Fishrmn] A question on aluminum boats In reply to
very interesting info. We polished aircraft engine inlet cowling, They were aluminum and had been fly and being polished since the 1950's. Never knew one to fall apart.