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Cabo San Lucas Fishing Report JUNE 8

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Cabo San Lucas Fishing Report JUNE 8
JC SPORTFISHING WEEKLY FISHING REPORT
As The Admiral Seas It
Fishing Report: 06/03/19 TO 06/09/19
Stop By Our Office for up to Date Fishing Report

MARLIN: MARLIN BITE VERY GOOD THIS WEEK, 4 MARLIN ON MONDAY, 2 MARLIN ON TUESDAY, 3 MARLIN ON WEDNESDAY, THE BITE IS VERY GOOD FROM THE 95 SPOT TO THE 1150. THE WATER IS 76 DEGREES ON THE 95, AND 80 DEGREES AT THE 1150.

TUNA: SOME NICE TUNA FAR OFFSHORE GOING EAST PAST THE 1150 NEAR THE GORDO AND CABRILLA BANKS BELOW SAN JOSE. BIG 250 YELLOW FIN TUNA CAUGHT 3 DAYS AGO.

DORADO: A FEW SMALL DORADO STARTING TO SHOW OFF GREY ROCK.

WAHOO: SOME NICE WAHOO SHOWING UP OFF GREY ROCK THEY ARE BITING ON RAPALAS AND LURES. BOB MARLIN CAUGHT A 50LB WAHOO 4 DAYS AGO!

INSHORE FISHING: STILL SOME NICE SIERRAS THEY ARE BITING ON RIGGED BALYHOO AND A FEW BITES ON GREEN HOOCHIES. LOTS OF WHITE BONITA ON THE PACIFIC SIDE AT THE LIGHTHOUSE TO THE PUMPHOUSE HAVE TO DEAL WITH SOME ROUGH SEAS ON THE PACIFIC SIDE THE WIND IS STILL BLOWING.

BOTTOM FISHING: FEW NICE GROUPER ON THE ROCK PILES DROPPING BAITS WITH HEAVY WEIGHTS. TRIGGERFISH, AND A FEW AMBERJACK, AND JACK CREVALLES.

ROOSTER: SOME NICE ROOSTERS CAUGHT ON LIVE BAIT A FEW OVER 35LBS FEATURED ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE. FROM THE LIGHTHOUSE TO THE PUMPHOUSE HAVE TO TARGET THEM ALL DAY WITH LIVE BAIT.

Jc Sportfishing Charters is a family owned and operated business and has been fishing in Cabo San Lucas for the past 25 years. Jerry, explains that his charter business is geared more for families and novice anglers, making sure everyone who charters a boat with him have a great time and lots of fun. We welcome families, and groups. We want everyone who fishes with us to take all the sites in and have a memorable experience. This is what is most important to us. We have and do a few tournaments each year and can cater to fisherman who might be interested in tournament fishing.
STOP BY JC SPORTFISHING FOR UP TO THE MINUTE FISHING REPORT.
BEWARE: Please beware of the guys in the street selling boat charters. If you wait till the day you are fishing and go to the dock where your boat is many times people will mislead you to another boat or dock trying to put you on a boat that was not meant for you. You need to have a person guide you to your boat, who is from a reputable charter company. This way there is no confusion or misleading. Please remember when renting Sport fishing boats in Cabo that you rent your boat from reputable and established business. Walk into a fishing fleet office and ask questions about what you are getting and what are the costs? You don't want to rent boats from vendors in the streets and you do not want to book through shady websites offering you the world. Check through travel forums about reputable fishing fleets to deal with. Look for testimonials about the fleet your booking, your charter with. Ask about what will the boat be supplying? Will it include beverages or lunches? How much does it cost to fillet your catch? Check to see if charter boat is insured? Ask about getting your catch smoked? Check cost of a fishing license. These are just a few things to consider when booking your charter boat. We will be talking more about this in the next weeks fishing report. Until next time good fishing and we hope to see you in Cabo soon. Come by the office here in Cabo and get all the latest up to date fishing report.
http://www.tempbreak.com/...php?&cwregion=cb

WAHOO:
Wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri) is a scombrid fish found worldwide in tropical and subtropical seas. Its speed and high-quality flesh make it a prized game fish.
The flesh of the wahoo is white to grey, delicate to dense, and highly regarded by many gourmets. The taste has been said to be similar to mackerel.[4] This has created some demand for the wahoo as a premium-priced commercial food fish. In many areas of its range, such as Hawaii, Bermuda and many parts of the Caribbean, local demand for wahoo is met by artisanal commercial fishermen, who take them primarily by trolling, as well as by recreational sports fishermen who sell their catch. Hoo as wahoo are popularly called in the US, are successfully fished with live bait around deep-water oil and gas platforms in the Gulf during the winter months.
Its body is elongated and covered with small, scarcely visible scales; the back is an iridescent blue, while the sides are silvery with a pattern of irregular vertical blue bars. These colors fade rapidly at death. The mouth is large, and the teeth of the wahoo are razor sharp. Both the upper and lower jaws have a somewhat sharper appearance than those of king or Spanish mackerel.
Specimens have been recorded at up to 2.5 m (8 ft 2 in) in length, and weighing up to 83 kg (183 lb). Growth can be rapid. Wahoo can swim up to 60 mph (96.5606 km/h). They are some of the fastest fish in the sea. Built like a torpedo, they are fast swimmers. Ono rarely school, but groups are often found around fish aggregation buoys. Surface catches indicate that Wahoo associate with banks, pinnacles and flotsam. However, longline catches suggest that this species is also widely distributed in the open ocean.
The wahoo may be distinguished from the related Atlantic king mackerel and from the Indo-Pacific narrow-barred Spanish mackerel by a fold of skin which covers the mandible when its mouth is closed. In contrast, the mandible of the king mackerel is always visible as is also the case for the smaller Spanish mackerel and Cero mackerel. The teeth of the wahoo are similar to those of king mackerel, but shorter and more closely set together.
The barracuda is sometimes confused with mackerel and wahoo, but is easy to distinguish from the latter two species. Barracuda have prominent scales, larger, dagger-like teeth, and lack the caudal keels and blade-like (forked) tail characteristic of the scombrids.
Wahoo tend to be solitary or occur in loose-knit groups of two or three fish. Where conditions are suitable, they can be found in schools as large as 100 or more. Their diet is made up of other fish and squid.

FROM THE ADMIRALS KITCHEN!

JCS SEARED WAHOO WITH MANGO SALSA.
INGREDIENTS:
(MANGO SALSA)
1/2 medium red onion, diced
2 1/2 cups mango chunks
2-3 green onion stalks, diced
1 medium red bell pepper, diced
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
1 jalapeo, diced
1 lime, juiced
1 lemon, juiced
1/2 tsp sea salt
SEARED WAHOO:
4 wahoo fillets
2 Tbsp avocado oil
sea salt
pepper

INSTRUCTIONS:

(MANGO SALSA)
Combine all ingredients in a medium-sized bowl and mix gently with a spatula.
Chill for at least 1 hour to allow the flavors to meld together.
SEARED WAHOO:
Dry the fillets completely.
Sprinkle both sides with salt and pepper.
Heat avocado oil in a skillet over medium heat.
When the oil is hot, carefully add the fillets and cook for 4 minutes. Make sure there is adequate space between the pieces of fish.
Flip the fillets and cook for 4 more minutes or until done. Adjust the cooking time based on the thickness of the fish fillets you are using.
Top with mango salsa and enjoy!

COCTAIL RECIPE:
JCS SPICED RUM GUAVA COCKTAIL
Ingredients:
1-1/2 ounces Oak Barrel Spiced Rum
ounce guava nectar
ounce freshly squeezed lime juice from about 1 lime (reserve lime shell)
ounce gunpowder green tea syrup (recipe follows)
ounce orange curaao
1 teaspoon salt and a pinch of cayenne pepper for garnish
Gunpowder Green Tea Syrup (Yields: 5 oz)
3 bags of gunpowder green tea (or two heaping tablespoons if you have loose tea)
cup granulated sugar
cup water
INSTRUCTIONS:
First, combine salt and cayenne pepper in a shallow bowl. Using your spent lime, moisten the outside of your cocktail glass by rubbing the rim with the lime. Rim the side of the cocktail glass in the salt and cayenne mixture.
Next, in a shaker ? filled with ice, pour in Oak Barrel Spiced Rum, guava nectar, lime juice, gunpowder green tea syrup, and orange curaao. Shake for 20 seconds and strain into pre-rimmed cocktail glass.
Gunpowder Green Tea Syrup (Yields: 5 oz)
In a small saucepan, combine sugar and water. Bring to a boil and remove from heat. Stir in teabags (or loose tea if using). Steep for 10 minutes. Strain and use immediately or store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to one month.