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Enomology terms

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Enomology terms
CoolFYI [/url]Abdomen[/url] One of an insect's three main body segments on which spiracles and reproductive organs are located; the most posterior segment. Adaptation[/url] Physical structures, characteristics or behaviors that allow an organism to survive and reproduce in its particular environment. Annual A plant that lives one year only. Antennae[/url] Sensory organs located on an insect's head used mostly for smell and hearing. Anterior[/url] Referring to the front end of an insect or animal. Calamistrum[/url] Row of toothed bristles on the metatarsal segment of the last leg, used to comb out cribellate silk. Carapace[/url] A hard covering over the dorsal surface of the body, or of at least the thorax. Cephalothorax[/url] First subdivision of a spider's body, combining the head and thorax. Chelicerae[/url] The first pair of appendages below the cephalothorax of a spider. Chitin[/url] Substance produced by an insect which hardens and forms its exoskeleton. Chrysalis [/url] The pupa, or stage of a butterfly's life cycle between larva and adult. Cocoon[/url] The silken case spun by many moth larvae as a protection for their pupae. Compound Eye[/url] Eye composed of many units, each with a lens or facet. Cremaster [/url] The hook-like process on the end of a chrysalis that attaches the pupa to the stem, twig, etc. Cribellum [/url] Sievelike spinning plate in front of the spinnerets. [/url] Diurnal[/url] Active during the day. Diversity[/url] Presence of a wide range of body types and systems in a taxon. Dorsal[/url] Referring to the upperside of an animal, the "back" side. Entomology[/url] The study of insects. Exoskeleton[/url] Supporting structure on the outside of the body of insects and other invertebrates. Frass[/url] The solid waste droppings of a larva or caterpillar. [/url] Habitat [/url] The kind of place where a plant or animal naturally lives. Head[/url] One of three main segments of an insect's body on which eyes, mouth, and antennae are found; the most anterior segment. Holotype [/url] The specimen of an animal (or plant) which is designated in the publication when the organism is named, as representing what is meant by the new name. The holotype specimen may or may not be the first ever collected, and may or may not be a good example of its kind, but it is the official designation: "THIS name refers to THIS animal." Often, other specimens are cited in the same publication, and are called "secondary types." Instar[/url] The period between two molts. [/url] Larva (pl., larvae)[/url] The immature stage in metamorphosis between the egg and pupa (plural: larvae). Butterfly larvae are referred to as caterpillars. Lateral [/url] Referring to the sides of the body. Lepidoptera[/url] "Scaley wing"-the order, or classification group, to which butterflies and moths belong. Mandible [/url] Mouthpart (jaw) on the head of the larva and some adult insects. Medial[/url] Referring to the mid-line of the body. Metamorphosis[/url] The process by which an animal changes in size and form during development. Metatarsus (pl., metatarsi)[/url] Sixth of eight segments of a spider's leg between the tibia and the tarsus; insects do not have this leg part. Molting [/url] Process of shedding old exoskeleton to make way for new. [/url] Nectar[/url] The sweet liquid produced by plants which some insects drink. Nocturnal [/url] Active at night. Palp (pl., palpi)[/url] Sensory structure on the head used like a tongue. Pedipalps [/url] Second pair of appendates on the cephalothorax of a spider, used to guide prey to the mouth. Perennial [/url] A plant that blossoms annually; continuous; undying. Pesticides [/url] Chemicals used to poison insects or other pests. Posterior [/url] Referring to the tail end. Proboscis[/url] Structure like a drinking straw used to suck up nectar or other fluids. Prolegs[/url] "False" legs on abdominal segments of larva. [/url] Scale[/url] Shingle-like covering on the membrane of the wing that gives butterflies and moths their colorful patterns. Spinneret[/url] Organ on the bottom of the larva head used to spin silk; in spiders. Spiracles[/url] Holes along the side of an insect's body through which it breathes. Tarsi[/url] Plural form of tarsus; last or distal leg segment consisting of one to five subdivisions or segments. Tentacles[/url] Sensory organs found at the front and rear of the Monarch larva, also called filaments. Thorax[/url] The second body segment of an insect, between the head and abdomen, on which wings and legs are located. Tibia[/url] Fourth leg segment, just preceding the tarsus. Type specimen [/url] A specimen which is designated in the publication of a new name for an organism. True legs[/url] Appendages located on the thoracic segments of a larva. [/url] Variation[/url] Individual differences found within a species, for example, differences in size, shape, color, presence or absence of certain structures. Ventral [/url] Referring to the underside of an animal, the "tummy" side. Vein [/url] A thin, mostly hollow structure in the wing.




Dryrod
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Re: [Dryrod] Enomology terms In reply to
WOW! VERY NICE DRCool



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Re: [flygoddess] Enomology terms In reply to

CoolJust thought that I would BUG you good people.Wink






Dryrod
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Re: [Dryrod] Enomology terms In reply to
you lost me with eno whatever.. I thought you were gonna discuss ento whatcha ma call it... Smile

MacFly Cool




...."May the holes in your net be no larger than the fish in it. ~Irish Blessing"
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Re: [flygoddess] Enomology terms In reply to
CoolFGD got me thinking about those little scurrying characters that the trout find delectable. And that is insects in general. My knowledge is limited as my course of studies deal more with the likes of protozoa, ameba, paramecia etc. Too damn small to see with the naked eye.
So let me start with the stonefly.
What do stoneflies look like?
The nymph of the stone fly has long antennae with a flat body and widely separated legs. Each segment of its body is covered by a large “bony” plate. It has two antennae-like tails called cerci. These multi-part tail pieces actually work a lot like antennae – they help the insect sense what is around it.
The adult stonefly has long antennae and long veined front wings, often dark grey in colour. They can grow up to 4 cm [about 1˝"] in length. The back wings are shorter than the front wings and fold under the front wings so that you cannot see them when the stonefly is resting. The stonefly nymph does not lose its long tail parts when it becomes an adult. You can see them peeking out from under its wings.
Where do stoneflies live?
Stonefly nymphs usually live beneath stones in fast-moving, clean water. Adult stoneflies are found near the streams and rivers from which they have emerged. They are not active fliers and usually remain near the ground where they feed on algae or lichens. Many adult stoneflies do not have mouth parts that work, so they cannot eat and they live only a short time.
Stoneflies are most common in cool, temperate climates. Different stonefly species are found all over the world – more than two thousand species!
Food for thought . . . stoneflies need clean, unpolluted water to live in. If there are no stoneflies near a river, does that tell you that the river is polluted? Tongue





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