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Current News Releases - January 2004

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Current News Releases - January 2004
Game and Fish PLI Staff to Host Open Houses

North Dakota Game and Fish Department biologists will introduce a new private lands program - called the Working Lands Programs - at a series of open house meetings for landowners in early February. Landowners are invited to attend and learn more about all the Game and Fish private lands programs and how they might fit into an agricultural operation, according to John W. Schulz, private land section leader.

Working lands is designed to evaluate wildlife value of land that is actively farmed or ranched. Land retirement, grass planting and pasture idling is not a requirement. "Landowners receive an annual payment that rewards past improvements in creating or improving wildlife habitat," Schulz said. "In addition, the program will also reward landowners for new wildlife habitat added to their current operation."

As with all Game and Fish private land contracts, walking public hunting access is part of a working lands agreement.

Additional Private Lands Initiative programs available to landowners include CRP cost-share, habitat plots, CoverLocks for Conservation, food plots, private forest conservation, and wetland reserve incentive.

All open houses are scheduled from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. local time. Game and fish personnel will be available during those hours to explain program objectives and producer benefits.

Open houses are set for:

* Tuesday, Feb. 3
Dickinson - North Dakota Game and Fish District Office
Center - Center Civic Center
Forman - Forman City Hall

* Wednesday, Feb. 4
Mott - Mott National Guard Armory
Beulah - Beulah Civic Center
LaMoure - LaMoure Civic Center

* Thursday, Feb. 5
Hettinger - Hettinger Research and Extension Center
Carson - Carson Community Center
Bismarck - North Dakota Game and Fish Main Offi



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(This post was edited by Bassmaster-ND on Jan 24, 2004, 3:03 PM)

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Re: [Bassmaster-ND] Current News Releases - January 2004 In reply to
Becoming an Outdoors-Woman Program Schedules Winter Workshops 012104
The North Dakota Game and Fish Department's Becoming an Outdoors-Woman program has scheduled one-day winter workshops Feb. 28 at Lake Metigoshe State Park, Bottineau, and March 20 at Devils Lake.

Beyond BO-W at Lake Metigoshe State Park has morning and afternoon sessions in dog sledding and winter survival; tracking and snowshoeing; and winter ecology and cross-country skiing. Participants must choose one of the three courses, with classes restricted to 15 entrants in each, according to Nancy Boldt, department BO-W coordinator.

The class scheduled for Devils Lake focuses on ice fishing, Boldt said. "Women signing up for ice fishing will learn about everything from ice augers to small lures, how to set up, jigging techniques, and how to be safe and warm on the ice."

Women interested in the workshops should register immediately due to limited space available. The cost is $45 and pre-registration with payment is required. Equipment and lunch will be provided.

Information and registration forms can be obtained by contacting Nancy Boldt, North Dakota Game and Fish Department, 100 N. Bismarck Expressway, Bismarck, ND 58501-5095; 701-328-6312; or email nboldt@state.nd.us.



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(This post was edited by Bassmaster-ND on Nov 17, 2005, 1:01 PM)

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Re: [Bassmaster-ND] Current News Releases - January 2004 In reply to
Watch for Watchable Wildlife Checkoff on State Tax Form 012104
State Game and Fish Department outreach biologist Jeb Williams reminds North Dakota taxpayers to look for the Watchable Wildlife checkoff on the state tax form.

The 2003 state income tax form gives wildlife enthusiasts an opportunity to support nongame wildlife like songbirds and birds of prey, while at the same time contributing to programs that help everyone enjoy all wildlife.

"The department has used funds received from the annual check-off to produce educational materials, such as a series of bird posters and a variety of publications," Williams said. "Other activities include birding field trips, small grants to assist groups with conservation projects, winter bird survey, bluebird conservation program and nursing home bird feeder program."

Look for the Watchable Wildlife Fund checkoff on lines 29 or 33 of your short form state tax return. The checkoff is an easy way to voluntarily contribute part of your tax refund (line 29) to sustain this long standing program. Or, if you have tax due, you can make a donation on line 33. In addition, direct donations to the program are accepted any time of year.

To learn more about Watchable Wildlife Program activities contact the department at 328-6300; or write the Watchable Wildlife Program at 100 N. Bismarck Expressway, Bismarck, ND 58501 5095



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(This post was edited by Bassmaster-ND on Apr 12, 2005, 8:40 PM)

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Re: [Bassmaster-ND] Current News Releases - January 2004 In reply to
Game and Fish to Host Wildlife Wednesdays

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department's outreach section is presenting a series of wildlife and conservation related talks beginning in February. The series is called Wildlife Wednesdays and will start Wednesday, Feb. 4 and run every Wednesday evening through March 3, according to Chris Grondahl, outreach supervisor.

The presentations - each lasting approximately 90 minutes - begin at 7 p.m. at the department's Bismarck office at the intersection of east Main Avenue and the Bismarck Expressway.

The programs are free, and written materials and handouts pertaining to each topic will be available. For questions concerning these events, contact either Jeb Williams at 328-6332 or Chris Grondahl at 328-6612. Program topics are listed below:

February 4 - Wildlife of North Dakota. A presentation using hands on materials including furs, wings, skulls and other props to teach about North Dakota wildlife, habitat, and adaptations for survival. This program is geared for both kids and adults.

February 11 - Attracting Bluebirds. A presentation on cavity nesting birds of North Dakota that includes how to construct bluebird houses and monitor nest success. Kids who attend will receive a free bluebird nesting box.

February 18 - Landscaping Your Yard for Wildlife. A presentation discussing the use of native grasses and wildflowers, fruit bearing shrubs and other wildlife friendly vegetation in your own yard. Discussion will also include tips for planting, dealing with wildlife damage and sources for more information.

February 25 - ND Sportsmen Year in Review. A presentation of topics that affected hunting and fishing during the 2003 season, and discussion of topics that will affect the future.

March 3 - Native Prairie Grasses and Wildflowers of North Dakota. A program that will help people identify many native prairie grasses and wildflowers. Discussion will also include planting and maintaining these species.



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Re: [Bassmaster-ND] Current News Releases - January 2004 In reply to
North Dakota Earth Day Patch Contest

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department is sponsoring a contest for design of a North Dakota Earth Day patch. The patch should incorporate some aspect of Earth Day - celebrated April 22 - or keeping North Dakota clean. The winner of the contest will receive a $200 savings bond, according to Jeb Williams, outreach biologist.

The contest is another avenue of raising awareness for our natural resources and their intended purpose, Williams said. "By bringing attention to the issue, it not only plants a seed with today's youth that the prairie is something to cherish, but it serves as a reminder to all that we need to protect our natural resources."

Contestants must be North Dakota residents between ages 6-18. The entry deadline is Jan. 31. Only one entry per person is allowed.

The patch must be round and three inches in diameter. There is a limit of five colors on the patch, and lettering must be printed. Name, address and phone number of the contestant must be clearly printed on the back of the entry design.

The winning design will be used on a patch given to members of Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, and 4-H clubs that participate in Earth Day cleanup projects on state-owned or managed lands in North Dakota in April.

Entries should be mailed to Jeb Williams, North Dakota Game and Fish Department, 100 N. Bismarck Expressway, Bismarck, ND 58501. For information, contact Williams at 328-6332; or email jwilliam@state.nd.us



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(This post was edited by Bassmaster-ND on Jan 14, 2005, 8:12 PM)

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Re: [Bassmaster-ND] Current News Releases - January 2004 In reply to
2004 Mid-Winter Bald Eagle Survey Complete
This year's mid-winter bald eagle survey along the Missouri River in central North Dakota revealed 50 birds, 11 more than last year and the highest recorded in the last 10 years, according to Patrick Isakson, nongame biologist for the North Dakota Game and Fish Department.

"We counted 37 adults and 13 immature bald eagles," Isakson said of the Jan. 12 survey. "Canada geese and eagles are still abundant on the river due to the availability of open water. Eagles were found along the entire stretch of river from just north of the Bismarck-Mandan area to Garrison Dam."

The number of bald eagles wintering in the state depends on the amount of open water and availability of prey, Isakson noted. Eagles prefer to perch in large cottonwood trees along the river and feed on fish and waterfowl.

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department participates in a nationwide survey each January to determine the number of bald eagles in each state. The survey is flown at a low altitude from Bismarck to the Garrison Dam, with an observer counting both adult and immature bald eagles.

Adults have a white head and tail and a dark brown body. Immature bald eagles are brown with irregular white plumage.

Bald eagles are unique to North America. Once an endangered species, bald eagles were reclassified as threatened in 1995 because of successful recovery efforts. "Most of the bald eagles were observed close to the Garrison Dam," Isakson said. "Annually, that area seems to be the best location to view eagles. In fact, we even observed two golden eagles in that vicinity."



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Re: [Bassmaster-ND] Current News Releases - January 2004 In reply to
2004 Mid-Winter Bald Eagle Survey Complete
This year's mid-winter bald eagle survey along the Missouri River in central North Dakota revealed 50 birds, 11 more than last year and the highest recorded in the last 10 years, according to Patrick Isakson, nongame biologist for the North Dakota Game and Fish Department.

"We counted 37 adults and 13 immature bald eagles," Isakson said of the Jan. 12 survey. "Canada geese and eagles are still abundant on the river due to the availability of open water. Eagles were found along the entire stretch of river from just north of the Bismarck-Mandan area to Garrison Dam."

The number of bald eagles wintering in the state depends on the amount of open water and availability of prey, Isakson noted. Eagles prefer to perch in large cottonwood trees along the river and feed on fish and waterfowl.

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department participates in a nationwide survey each January to determine the number of bald eagles in each state. The survey is flown at a low altitude from Bismarck to the Garrison Dam, with an observer counting both adult and immature bald eagles.

Adults have a white head and tail and a dark brown body. Immature bald eagles are brown with irregular white plumage.

Bald eagles are unique to North America. Once an endangered species, bald eagles were reclassified as threatened in 1995 because of successful recovery efforts. "Most of the bald eagles were observed close to the Garrison Dam," Isakson said. "Annually, that area seems to be the best location to view eagles. In fact, we even observed two golden eagles in that vicinity."



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Re: [Bassmaster-ND] Current News Releases - January 2004 In reply to
Game Warden Exam Set for March 5

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department has scheduled an examination to select candidates for the position of district game warden. The test will be given at 10 a.m., March 5, at the department's main office in Bismarck.

Applicants must register to take the exam by submitting a letter of intent to chief game warden Ray Goetz, North Dakota Game and Fish Department, 100 N. Bismarck Expressway, Bismarck, ND 58501-5095. Letters of intent must be submitted before 5 p.m., Feb. 25.

Game warden applicants must be at least 21 years of age and in good physical condition. Work requires the ability to perform physically demanding tasks involving lifting and carrying large, heavy objects, walking and running over uneven terrain, and tolerating adverse weather and other environmental conditions.

Game wardens enforce game and fish laws and related regulations in an assigned district and other locations as determined by the department. Wardens normally work alone under varied conditions, some of which are adverse, at all hours of the day, night, and weekends. In addition to law enforcement duties, wardens assist with other programs such as hunter and boater safety education, as well as assisting other divisions in the department.

The position requires a bachelor's degree, preferably in criminal justice or one of the biological sciences. Applicants must be a licensed North Dakota peace officer, or be eligible to be licensed, and must possess a valid driver's license.

Highest scoring applicants on the exam will be selected for interview. Selection procedures include an evaluation of the application, a structured oral interview and reference checks, and psychological and medical examinations. Successful applicants are then placed on the list for future game warden openings.

The salary range for beginning game wardens is $2,623-4,371 per month upon completion of training. Travel allowance, uniforms, and other equipment are provided



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