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GPS
I am starting to go over my "wish list" and find that there are still a few items that I haven't yet aquired. One of them is a GPS. I understand the theory behind them (you know all of the satellites up there with nothing better to do than to bounce various waves off of them) but I have never seen one operated. My question is this, how much does one need to spend in order to have one that is adequate for marking and/or locating a spot on a lake? Any recommendations on brands and models, and sources would be appreciated.


“How would your life be different if…You stopped making negative judgmental assumptions about people you encounter? Let today be the day…You look for the good in everyone you meet and respect their journey.”
-- Steve Maraboli

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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
What ever brand or type you decide on, spend the extra cash and get one that has mapping capabilities. You will not regret it. You can download maps, way points etc from your computer and see the maps on the GPS screen.

I have a Magellan MAP330M and RNL has a Magellan Meridian and they are both good units. The Meridian has upgradable memory, I think compact flash, that enables it to hold bigger maps than my fixed 7 meg. Hey, 7 meg will show half of Utah but 64 meg will show half or more of the US! I'm sure RNL can added a lot more to this thread with good info as well as several others.

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Re: [BearLakeMack] GPS In reply to
  I'm with you Kent, A GPS is on my wish list too! I have know idea how they work or how you to coordinate with a computer.

tommy

San Diego

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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
Kent I was looking at them yesterday at radio shack. Here is info on the three they had. I do not know any thing about them or what options are necessary. Maybe some one on the board can explain what these options are used for. Radio Shack will let you demo any of these for 30 days no charge. All three are water proof and they float. All are Magellan brands.

SporTrack Map: full mapping capabiities - 8mb of built-in maps and memory. 2mb map database with interstate highways,state highways,parks, waterways,airports,and cities is installed. 6mb built-inmemory for additional detailed map downloads 9 user configeration navigation screens include map,compass,largedata, position, speedometer,road and stripcompass. Full 3-Dtopo support. This unit cost $199.99

SporTrack Pro: 9mb North American base map of roads, waterways,parks,airports,marine navaids,buoys and obstructions is installed. 23mb of built-in memory is included for additional detailed map downloads. Full 3-D topo support. 9 user-configeration navigation screen (same as SporTrack Map) This unit costs $269.00

Merdian Platinum: 16mb built-in database of u.s. cities,interstate highways,state highways,major waterways,navaids and airports is installed. Increase your mapping detailed detail by downloading maps onto optional 16, 32 or 64mb secure digital memory cards. Built in barometer. Full 3-D topo support. This unit costs $349.00 and if you want it in color plus a couple more options it will cost you $549.00
(This post was edited by MGB on Mar 16, 2003, 4:16 PM)

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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
im with blm on this one, i have a garmin etrex but whenever i use it i wish it could have a map on it. My dad paid 65$ for mine but it is not the best out there and if you are goning to use it on your boat then you should go the extra money and buy a high quality gps. I can verify that a gps does make finding the honey holes a lot easier on a river just press the mark button and its stored on mem. hope i helped out kent.


Later Days
FB2

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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
Wink
Kent,
Here's my choice. Lowrance I-finder. It has a base map of North and South America that shows cities, roads, rails, lakes,and streams. It supports MMC cards and SD cards to 128 M. They sell it in four configurations. One has tons of info on roads, gas stations, hotels and such, One has 70,000 navagation aids for the Great Lakes, the East and West coasts. The basic model is available at Wall Mart for 219.00 right now. You can add the MMC cards as you like. Or they sell it with their map software and the interface for your PC.

They even have an Easy Mode for beginners. I've had a Lowrance GPS unit and an Eagle GPS unit (made by Lowrance), and the only problem with them is that their old units is their need for batteries. They use 4 AA cells, and their new units use 2 AAs.

My two cents.
Fishrmn

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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
I agree with the others about the computer interface. I personally use a Garmin eTrex. It's been a great unit. It is very easy to use, and it works amazingly well. The price isn't too much, you can pick one up for around 100 bucks. I use the mapping software published by Maptech, and my computer and my GPS are very easy to interface and transfer waypoints. I have never used one of the mapping GPS's, but I'm sure if you can afford it, they are a very worthwhile investment. I've heard that you need to stick with magellan, lowrance, or garmin when you buy one. Good luck with your purchase.

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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
Definately go with one that has a map feature. I have a Magellan 320, has been a really good unit, but as was mentioned above, I also wish it had map every time I use it.

Mike (Boatiac)

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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
i want this one: its in color!

http://www.magellangps.com/...oduct.asp?PRODID=171

very competitive on ebay . ..

http://search-desc.ebay.com/search/search.dll?MfcISAPICommand=GetResult&query=magellan+meridian+color+gps&cgiurl=http%3A%2F%2Fcgi.ebay.com%2Fws%2F&ht=1&from=R10&currdisp=2&itemtimedisp=1&st=2&SortProperty=MetaEndSort&srchdesc=y&BasicSearch=





sm


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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
Kent,

I used to have one on my former 350A and it was a great help. It wasn't mapping, but I would set a waypoint at the mouth of the marina and at the day's end I'd just head to that waypoint. The first time I ever used it was at Lake Powell. I stayed out fishing late with my kids and knew I was going to have a hard time finding my campsite. But I retraced my steps and it lead me exactly to my camp.

When fishing I mark a fish icon each time I catch a fish, then I turn around and troll back through all the marks--connect the dots. I also use it on open water to troll in patterns and not cover the same unproductive water twice.

You can get handheld units with tiny displays or combo GPS/sonar units. Or units that sit next to your graph on the console. If you don't get a mapping unit, you can save a lot of money. Or you can buy one with mapping software that includes bottom contours on certain lakes. The fancier you get the more confusing it becomes as there's a lot of growth and little standards.

Choose one that you find easy to use, that fits your budget, and that has the features you want for the activities you'll use it for--fishing, hiking, driving, etc. Most agree that the Garmin units have the most intuitive interface.

Here's some links for online bargain sites, though play with them hands-on before ordering...

www.affordablegps.com

gpscity.com

www.gpsnow.com

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Re: [DennisW] GPS In reply to
I think everything you're saying is true but the nice thing about having the map on the screen is if you know where you are supposed to be going, you can turn on your GPS and use the directional arrow to get you there without having to have a way point.

For example, we were on the east side of Fish Lake in a whiteout storm. We hadn't set a way point back to the parking lot at the Fish Lake Lodge but we were still able to go directly back to the Fish Lake Lodge because we had the map on the GPS that showed it and the directional arrow to guide us.

I've had both kinds and I definitely wouldn't go back to a GPS without mapping. JMO...

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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
If you go with a Magellan, I might add that it made no sense to me to pay for the larger built in database of the Meridian Gold or Platinum if I was going to buy the map software which has greater detail then the built in databases anyway. I've got all of Utah, Idaho, and the western half of Wyoming on a 64M SD card and I haven't even used up half of it yet. I also did not need/want the barometer and electronic compass of the Platinum. An electronic compass is an expensive feature, yet you can take two steps with a GPS receiver that doesn't have an electronic compass and it will tell you exactly which direction you just walked.

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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
I am personally fairly new to using GPS. However, from the research I did before buying one, I ended up going with Garmin. The Magellan units are probably just as good, but it seemed that Garmin had a far larger selection of mapping software to choose from. Also, the customer support people were very helpful in outlining some of the differences between their software.

I ended up going with the new Garmin Rino 120. This one has 8MB memory but it also comes with a built in FRS and GMRS radio that you can use with your Motorola TalkAbout radios...a big bonus to me. In fact, if you have 2 Rino units and use them to talk back and forth it will send the GPS coordinates from one to the other and will map where the other person is. There are also a lot of other really cool features with this unit.

If you do decide to check out the Rinos, spend the extra $$$ and go with the 120. The 110 only has 1MB of memory and you cannot download maps onto it. It will plot a path and save waypoints, but it does not use actual maps.

Anyway, that is what I ended up with and I really love it.

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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
I just bought a GPS and I spent alot of time researching for the best unit for the dollar. I talked with many people and also searched on the internet. I found out the Garmin have a much better product and is easier to use. I would recommend that you only buy a unit that has mapping capabilities and comes with a PC interface cable. I bought the Gamin Legend and i love it. I bought mine through the internet at www.thegpsstore.com also check out www.trendyimports.com The 2 units that i would recommend buying is the Garmin Legend and the Garmin Vista. I hope this helps






Take a Kid Fishing today!!!!!

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Re: [kidsnme] GPS In reply to
   You bought it for around $219.00? How much memory can it take?

thx tommy

San Diego

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Re: [tomegun] GPS In reply to
Yes i bought it for $219 but right now it has a $50 rebate which brings it down to$170. It has 8 megabytes of memory, which is plenty. You do not have to store the topo maps of the whole United States. 8 megs will hold most of the state of Utah's topo map. Hope this helps

kidsnme






Take a Kid Fishing today!!!!!

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Re: [kidsnme] GPS In reply to
what about this unit,Magellan Meridian Marine Handheld GPS


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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
Shocked
My wish list just got shorter. That I-finder at Wall Mart dropped in price to $146.44 the other day, so I went down this morning and bought it. Now I just have to get the software and load up a MMC card.

My brother in law has an Etrex, so my experience with it was limited to one week out in California. For me the buttons on the side just didn't work out right.

A friend of mine had the cheapest model of Magellen, and that thing wouldn't aquire a fix while we walked 6 or 8 blocks in open country. It didn't have a parrallel receiver, so we were obviously asking it to do the impossible.

Good luck with choosing one for yourself.

Fishrmn

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Re: [Fishrmn] GPS In reply to
In defense of the Magellan units, I have had two magellan units and both have functioned perfectly. My new unit, the MAP330M with full mapping capabilities and I got it at a closeout sale through Cabela's for $169 (regular retail $269 - $299). That's a heck of a good price for full mapping capabilites. I'm sure the I-finder is a good unit but so are the Magellans.

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Re: [BearLakeMack] GPS In reply to
Unsure
BLM,
Sorry if it looked like I was slamming the Magellen units. I'm sure the new ones are fine, but the one that I had experience with was little more valuable than a paperweight. The lack of a parallel reciever was the biggest problem. I'm partial to the buttons on the front of the units, so the Etrex line just doesn't appeal to me. Something about having to turn the unit to the side to see which button performs which function is difficult for me to get used to. If you used it enough, maybe the functions would become second nature to you. Some people can dial a phone or use a 10 key number pad without looking at the numbers. I don't get enough practice to be sure of myself. It just seems more comfortable to look at the front of the unit, kind of like looking at a cell phone.

I just couldn't pass up the deal that I found.

Good luck.

Fishrmn

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Re: [Fishrmn] GPS In reply to
No problemo, amigo. Nothing wrong with the deal you got. I hope your unit does you as good job as The Magellan has for me. Later, dude.

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Re: [kentofnsl] GPS In reply to
I've used GPS receivers and GIS on computers professionally for years. Trimble (e.g. GeoExplorer) is the best hardware on the market (sub-meter accuracy), but none of us can justify the cost of a Trimble for personal use and we're not doing GIS on a day-to-day basis, so I looked at Magellan and Garmin.

Although Garmin offers more software product options, Magellan's MapSend Topo USA software beats Garmin's Mapsource Topo USA software (or any other topo software option for the Garmin for that matter) hands down as far as contour lines and other details. I could go on about the differences, but instead, I'd suggest you take both units with the software loaded outside the store, turn them on, and compare. If there isn't much terrain in the area you're in, you may not be able to see many contour intervals on either unit. If that's the case, scroll them both over to Little Mountain just west of Brigham City. How many contour lines do you see describing the mountain on the Garmin? How many contour lines do you see describing the mountain on the Magellan? How about other details? You WILL see the differences. The difference in the field is that where the Garmin will show you a simple slope of a hill, the Magellan will show you the cliffs on it and the washes running down it, with numerous contour lines.

I will also add that the Meridian model is water proof (except for the battery compartment), floats, and has a thick rubber shock ring around it so it can take a fall without breaking into a million pieces.
(This post was edited by RipNLips on Mar 20, 2003, 12:10 AM)